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Harvard Referencing Guide: Webpage - Introduction

Webpage - Introduction

Webpage - Introduction

Webpage - Introduction

Webpage - Introduction

 

Obtaining information from the Internet is very popular. However, web pages can be created by almost anyone regardless of their level of expertise in the subject. Whenever you access a web  page to support your learning, you should take time to evaluate the accuracy and authenticity of the 'information' it contains.

 

For example, you should consider :

  • the credibility of the author - is the author an expert in the subject?
  • the reason(s) behind the creation of the website - could the information be biased in some way?
  • the age of the web site - is the information out-of-date?
  • the country of origin - e.g. for information relation to UK law or accounting practices, it may be advisable to access UK websites.

 

You should also remember that information on a website can be removed or changed - you may not be able to access the same information at a later date.  For this reason, you should make a note of the actual date at which you access a web page if you intend to use the information it contains.

 

 

A reference to a web site will generally require the following elements:

 

  • Author 
  • Year that the site was published / last updated. (in round brackets)
  • Title of the web page (in italics)
  • Available at: URL
  • (Accessed: date)

Harvard Referencing Guide: A - Z